Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Finger Lickin Christmas

Niu FM (25 Dec 2014) presenters talk about the Japanese “tradition” of ordering KFC on Christmas Day.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

May 1915 Truce

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

One hundred years ago today, the high death rate on Gallipoli triggered an extraordinary truce between the two opposing sides.

The tremendous number of casualties on both sides since the landings on April 25th had led to a large number of unburied corpses piling up between the trenches. As temperatures climbed the health risk and stench these caused became unbearable, and on the 22nd of May Turkish Major Kemal Ohri was escorted, blindfolded to Anzac headquarters to negotiate a truce, so the dead could be buried.

Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey. 22 May 1915. Captain Sam Butler, holding the white truce flag, leads the blindfolded Turkish envoy Major Kemal Ohri from General Birdwood's Headquarters to return to the Turkish lines after arranging the burial armistice for 24 May 1915.
Gallipoli Peninsula, 22 May 1915. Captain Sam Butler (holding the white flag) leads the blindfolded Turkish Major Kemal Ohri back to the Turkish lines after arranging the armistice for 24 May 1915. Image courtesy of the Australian War Memorial Museum.

On the 24th of May at an arranged time, a white flag was flown and men cautiously came out of their trenches to begin the grim task. For many, it was a chance to see the enemy face to face.

Those involved still had vivid memories of their close encounters with the enemy when they were interviewed many years later, as you can hear in this selection of recordings from our Anzac: Sights Sounds of World War I website.

Talking WUFF with Dan Harris

We caught up with Dan Harris, a talented and fascinating Wellington filmmaker, whose film, Bodies In the Void, will screen as part of the Wellington Underground Film Festival (WUFF) this weekend.

Ellen Pullar, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision: Your film, Bodies In The Void, has been selected to screen as the finale to the Wellington Underground Film Festival (WUFF) this Saturday evening. Could you tell us a bit more about the film, and your inspirations making it?

Dan Harris: This film started out as an experiment and just kind of developed over time. I made a few animations and then tried to replicate the animations in real life. Initially it was just a way of exploring form, I wanted to make it hard to differentiate what was filmed and what was 3D rendered. I’m fascinated by technologies that deal with virtual space or detached realities. Oculus Rift, camera drones, Second Life, anything where the line between the real and virtual become blurred. It makes me excited and kind of terrified at the same time.

A still from Bodies in the Void. See the film as part of WUFF 7pm this Saturday.
A still from Bodies in the Void. See the film as part of WUFF 7pm this Saturday.

EP: Each year WUFF attracts hundreds of submissions from around the world. The fact that your films have been selected for three WUFF festivals is very impressive! Festival Director Rosie Rowe tells us your films express a distinctive “style and voice that I would claim should be recognised internationally.” Can you tell me a bit more about your background as a filmmaker – what drew you to film initially? And what draws you to WUFF, in particular?

DH: I started using video when I was about 14-15, just filming my friends skating. I think I liked filming because it took the attention away from me being a lousy skater  ha. I was really into Spike Jonze skate and music videos, they were clever and not super high-production. It kind of opened my eyes to what was possible to make with little or no money. Since then I’ve always appreciated work that was made for cheap, and I’ve always preferred the experience of being in small crews or one-on-one collaborations. WUFF caters a lot to that type of work.

Also, I just want to say the films I’ve submitted to WUFF couldn’t have happened without the music of Cartoon (Ryan Bennett) and Jupiter Phrixos Njörðr  sound is a definite driving force for me. Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Andy’s Barbed Wire Collection

Andy Fox shows his collection of barbed-wire examples to Cosmo Kentish-Barnes (Country Life, Radio New Zealand National, 30 January 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

You can hear the full feature here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Weather Forecast from Maranui FM

The weather forecast read by pupils of Lyall Bay Primary School (Maranui FM, 8 December 2014), followed by an advert for the station’s sponsor – Rita Angus Retirement Village. Maranui FM was set up in 2008 and is run solely by the pupils. The station has six on-air slots per day covered by up to ten students.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

The Daisy Patch

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

On the 8th of May 1915, New Zealand forces on Gallipoli were involved in the disastrous charge across a piece of land known as “The Daisy Patch.”

The charge was part of the Second Battle of Krithia, which began on 6th of May, when the Allies launched a series of unsuccessful daylight assaults on the Ottoman trenches in the south of the peninsula. They suffered heavy losses and were unable to break through.

The New Zealand Infantry Brigade went into action on the 8th, and as Joe Gasparich of the Auckland Infantry Battalion recalled years later, the attack against well dug-in Turkish machine guns was either murder – or suicide. Listen to Joe’s first-hand account here.

Joe Gasparich.
Joe Gasparich.

For more information on the Battle of Krithia visit nzhistory.net.nz

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Two Views on the Royal Visit

Two different perspectives on the 2014 royal visit: the first clip comes from Free FM’s “From the Fringes” programme (Free FM, 9 April 2014); followed by Grant Dalton talking about yacht racing with Prince William and Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge (“Mike Hosking Breakfast,” Newstalk ZB, 11 April 2014).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Projecting Film Today: An Interview with Projectionist Oscar Halberg

This post belongs to a two-part series. Read the first part, Projecting Film 100 Years Ago: The Motion Picture Handbook, here.

This week, we chat to Oscar Halberg, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s projectionist, about the ins-and-outs, perks and downfalls of his job. Oscar has a high degree of expertise when it comes to film projection, having been working in the field for over twenty years. His skills are in high demand: as well as working for Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, he has projected films for a number cinemas and festivals in Wellington and elsewhere in New Zealand. Speaking to him, I was struck by the same level of perfectionism that was a feature of the 1915 Motion Picture Handbook: A Guide for Managers and Operators of Picture Theatres, which was the subject of an earlier blog – a precise nature must be a prerequisite to be a projectionist!

Projecting 35mm film in the Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision projection booth.
Projecting 35mm film in the Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision projection booth.

Oscar Halberg: As an audience you don’t see the booth, you don’t really think about how that image is put on screen, and how much work does go into that. I can’t tell you the amount of people that used to say to me “what do you do for a job?” and I’d say “I’m a projectionist,” then roll my eyes because typical responses are: “Oh you must get to see all the movies then! What did you think about so-and-so?”, or “you just put a tape in and press play, right?”, thinking it’s like VHS at home, which – of course – it isn’t. And I tell them “It’s a little bit more complicated than that,” and then you have to get into the whole “It’s in 20 minute reels, and you have to join all of those reels together.” You get to see the first five minutes and the end. You always see the end before you see the beginning, which was one of the reasons why I hated Pulp Fiction (1994) for the longest time, because I just couldn’t justify the fact that the opening scene was the same as the closing scene!

Ellen Pullar (Digital Programme Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision): When did you decide to become a projectionist? How long have you been doing it?

Oscar: 23 years. Since 1992, when I started my apprenticeship. I haven’t always worked as a projectionist, but there’s never been more than three or four months where I haven’t had to project a film. Though probably in the last three years I’m doing less and less 35mm work, it’s all digital. The interesting difference between digital and 35mm is clearly it’s not as physical – you’re not lifting film around all the time and carrying prints. But you still do the same sort of work, you just go about doing it differently – so instead of using a splicer, I use a mouse. Though a feature in the digital sense is full and complete. It is assembled in the same way, digital film still has reels. So they’ll have reel one, with visuals and the audio soundtrack, and then they’ll have, reel two and three – but they’re all joint together as what they call a “Digital Cinema Package” or “DCP.”

A film joiner, used to repair broken film.
A film joiner, used to repair broken film.

Ellen: So it can’t be that one part gets damaged or corrupted? Continue reading