Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: The Power of By, For and About

The power of community radio is demonstrated in this excerpt from Arrow FM’s “The Road to Recovery and Freedom” 11 March 2016), in which Mark Davis gives a first-hand account to listeners of dealing with depression while at the same time drawing strength from the act of making radio. Access community radio is anchored in the principal of a community being empowered to make radio about the community, for the community, by the community.


 

You can hear full episodes of the programme here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Audio from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

TinaCross2

Celebrating Dance in New Zealand

By Diane McAllen (Digital Programme Developer – Medianet, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

New Zealanders have always been dancing! From learning folk dances in stuffy school halls, to taking to the stage for awesome choreographed kapa haka or ballet, to just letting our hair down, trying a breakdance move or boogying with some mates, we have all taken part in some form of dance and no doubt enjoyed it.

This week (23-30 April) is New Zealand Dance Week, a national event that aims to celebrate and elevate the awareness of all forms of dance. Check out the DANZ website for dance events in your area. As part of Dance Week, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision are holding special film screenings in Wellington.

Within Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s collections, there are numerous films of New Zealanders tripping the light fantastic. Included are performances at community events such as fairs, galas, parades, and anniversaries, where children dance in formation, highland swing to bagpipes, dress in fairy costumes and twirl in rings. There are also a wealth of stage presentations, including by the Royal New Zealand Ballet, Limbs Dance Company, and Black Grace. Alongside these are television interviews with some of our most influential choreographers, such as Douglas Wright and Mary Jane O’Reilly. There are also short films were dance is a central artistic component – for example Len Lye’s Rainbow Dance (1936), and Phil Dadson’s Footstep Hocket(1990).

You can view these films and more at our Wellington or Auckland medialibraries or at our medianet sites around the country.

 

Here’s a fun selection of films to help you get into the swing of it.

Serpentine Dance (1895)
A “Skirt Dance,” a popular vaudeville attraction, performed by Annabelle Moore. This film was shown at Wellington’s first public screening of motion pictures, held at the Exchange Hall, 28 October 1896.

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Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: George Bissett’s Bugle

Producer Shelley Wilkinson visits the National Army Museum Te Mata Toa to learn about the shrapnel-torn bugle of twenty-year-old bugler George Bissett, killed on the 27 April 1915 – just two days after landing on Gallipoli (“Bugle Stories,” RNZ Concert, 24 April 2015).

Learn more about George here.

You can hear the full radio feature here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Audio from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

NITH2

Now is the Hour

We are thrilled to be screening a film of Limbs Dance Company performing “Now is the Hour” in 1988 this month. Screenings will take place in Auckland on April 26, and Wellington on April 28 & 29.

This week, we caught up with Dr Marianne Schultz (DANZ Advisor), who danced in this production.

“Come on Tauranga, get your mind out of the gutter, you should know better.” This placard, amongst assorted others (“Curiosity Killed the Cat”; “You Can’t Pull the Wool Over God’s Eyes”) greeted patrons as they entered the Baycourt Theatre on a balmy March evening in 1988. The Concerned Citizens Group of Tauranga took it upon themselves to alert an innocent public as to the moral dangers that awaited them as audience members of Limb’s Dance Company’s performance of Douglas Wright’s Now Is The Hour.

Tauranga protesters.
Tauranga protesters. Image: Bay of Plenty Times, 26 March 1988, p.1.

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NZBFF panel

Bikes vs Cars Panel Discussion

On 8 April we screened the documentary Bikes vs Cars (Sweden, 2015) in Wellington, as part of the New Zealand Bicycle Film Festival.  The screening was followed by a panel discussion, focusing on cycling issues in Wellington. On the panel were:

  • Jeremy Rose (RNZ)
  • Dougal List (National Cycling Manager, NZTA)
  • James Burgess (Cycle Aware Wellington, President)
  • Leah Murphy (Frocks on Bikes, Founder)

Watch a video of the panel discussion:

 

The New Zealand Bicycle Film Festival is supported by Wellington City Council’s Communities on Bikes Fund.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Where There’s Life There’s Hope

Veteran broadcaster, documentary maker and author Rob Harley talks to John Cowan about a near death experience in 2015 (“Real Life with John Cowan,” Newstalk ZB, 27 March 2016).


 

Listen to the full interview here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Audio from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

The Birth of Talkback Radio in New Zealand

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Co-ordinator, Radio – Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

"Women’s Hour" personalities from NZBC commercial stations in 1960. Doreen Kelso of 2ZB Wellington, seated second from right (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Documentation Collection).
“Women’s Hour” personalities from NZBC commercial stations in 1960. Doreen Kelso of 2ZB Wellington, seated second from right (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Documentation Collection – RNZ Photographic Collection).

Talkback radio has long been cornerstone of late night commercial broadcasting. It can be a familiar voice for lonely shift workers and insomniacs, an outlet for people with strong opinions of all kinds or just a friendly ear for anyone wanting a chat.

In this country, it began just over 50 years ago and recordings in the Sound Collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision tell the story of the roots of talkback. You can hear me talking about them to Jon Bridges on RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan programme here – or listen to the recordings below.

Talkback radio began very modestly in October 1965, on the commercial network stations of the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (one of the predecessors to Radio New Zealand). It was part of what had been known as The Women’s Hour. This was a slot every weekday afternoon around 2pm, which featured a local female host presenting topics thought to be of particular interest to female listeners. This programming had begun back in the 1940s and by the 1960s stations in the main centres and over a dozen regional towns –including Timaru, Nelson, Whangarei, Napier and Invercargill – all had their own local Women’s Hour host. While its focus was very heavily on domestic issues such as sharing recipes and home hints, the slot also featured studio guests, visiting celebrities, book reviews, radio dramas and the vital local advertising aimed at female shoppers.

In Masterton in the mid-1960s the Women’s Hour host was the redoubtable Jessica Weddell, who was just starting out in radio, but who would later move to Wellington where she would become the Kim Hill or Kathryn Ryan of her day, as a national current affairs interviewer. In an interview later in her career,  she explained how she was a talkback “guinea pig” and the first to trial this revolutionary idea of allowing listeners to call the studio:

Jessica Weddell – excerpt from Directions 70 – Jessica Weddell, National Radio, 9 August 1994

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Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: “Dr Max”

Students from St Patrick’s School, Masterton interview “Dr Max” about the importance of sleep. The interview is part of Live Wires, a regular programme broadcast on Arrow FM (Wairarapa) featuring students from around the region.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

Listen to other episodes here

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Sound

Rowley Habib

Kua mate a Rowley Habib o Ngāti Tūwharetoa. He kaituhi, he kaitito rotarota, kua hoki ki ngā mātua i te pō.

We mourn Rowley Habib of Ngāti Tūwharetoa. A Māori writer and poet who pioneered Māori centred drama.

Listen to Rowley Habib reading his poem dedicated to the men of the 28th Māori Battalion, The Raw Men, in this excerpt from a radio programme from 1968:

Māori Programme, 1 May 1968

 

 

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz