35 Years Ago: Springbok Tour Protests in Wellington

On July 29,  in Wellington, 2,000 protesters opposing the Springbok Tour were confronted by police who used batons to stop them marching up Molesworth St to the home of South Africa’s ambassador in Wadestown. This was the first use of batons against protestors and the violence horrified many people. There were no mobile phones in 1981, so reporters couldn’t provide live coverage from the middle of a march, but RNZ reporters Lindy Fleming and James Weir were there and reported back in the studio on what they saw and captured with their tape recorders.

 

Report on Wellington Protests (29 July 1981)

 

Karen Brough, injured during an anti Springbok rugby tour demonstration in Wellington - Photograph taken by Ian Mackley. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1981/2623/21-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22860506
Karen Brough, injured during an anti Springbok rugby tour demonstration in Wellington – Photograph taken by Ian Mackley. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1981/2623/21-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22860506

You can listen to the Molesworth Street action and other 1981 anti-Tour protests from around the country, in a compilation of radio coverage here.

Learn more about radio coverage of the Springbok Tour here.

Protesters in Hamilton during a demonstration against the 1981 Springbok tour - Photograph taken by Phil Reid. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1981/2599/3-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22551319

Covering the Tour

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Thirty-five years ago this week we were in the middle of New Zealand’s “winter of discontent,” with the country embroiled in the 1981 Springbok Tour. Protests took place all over the country,  with many families divided between rugby fans – who thought sports should not be concerned with political issues – and those who felt New Zealand should be joining the international boycott and cutting all sporting ties with apartheid-era South Africa.

Radio New Zealand news and sports reporters were in the thick of it, as the conflict between police, protestors and rugby fans became more and more heated. You can hear me talking to RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan about some of the archived sound recordings from those turbulent times held in the radio collection at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, or read more and find links to the recordings below.

Protestors and police officers at Rugby Park, Hamilton - Photograph taken by Phil Reid. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1981/2596/10-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23098586
Protestors and police officers at Rugby Park, Hamilton – Photograph taken by Phil Reid. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1981/2596/10-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23098586

 

In the tour opener at Gisborne, anti-tour protesters had managed to break through a perimeter fence but were prevented from occupying the field and disrupting the match. Three days later, at Rugby Park in Hamilton on July 25,  Waikato prepared to take on the Springboks. Over 500 police officers were present in the city but the protest planners had also been busy, buying more than 200 tickets for the game to ensure that protesters could make their presence known. As it was a Saturday, more people were able to protest, and around 5,000 gathered to march on Rugby Park. Shortly before kick-off, RNZ’s sports commentators, the late Graeme Moody and John Howson found themselves covering the action as protestors broke down the fence and made their way onto the field.

 

Report on Protests at Rugby Park (25 July 1981) 

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C’mon Jack!

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Leading up to the Summer Olympics in Rio here are some golden sporting moments from Aotearoa’s past.

Photograph of Jack Lovelock winning the 1500 metres at the Berlin Olympic Games. Lovelock, John Edward (Jack), 1910-1949 : Papers. Ref: MSX-2261-062. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22860702
Photograph of Jack Lovelock winning the 1500 metres at the Berlin Olympic Games. Lovelock, John Edward (Jack), 1910-1949 : Papers. Ref: MSX-2261-062. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22860702

On the 6 August 1936, 80 years ago, Jack Lovelock won the gold medal in the 1500 metre race at the Summer Olympics in Berlin. He also set a new world record of 3 minutes 47.8 seconds. Lovelock’s friend – 1924 sprint gold-medallist Harold Abrahams – commentates in this exciting radio broadcast. The audio excerpt ends with Lovelock briefly reflecting on the win.

1500m race – Summer Olympics in Berlin, 6 August 1936

 

Continue reading

CorporalWilliams

Audio Curios: The Horses Stayed Behind

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has started acquiring the arts programme Upbeat, which broadcasts every weekday on RNZ Concert. Upbeat covers a wide range of art topics, and – to my knowledge – is the only national daily radio arts programme in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

"The Horses Stayed Behind," courtesy of Cat Auburn, http://www.catauburn.com
“The Horses Stayed Behind,” courtesy of Cat Auburn

 

A recent interview saw host Eva Radich interview Sarah McClintock from the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui about the art work The Horses Stayed Behind. The work by artist Cat Auburn is a memorial to the thousands of horses that were transported from Aotearoa and died in Word War I. The artwork is made up of hundreds of rosettes created using horse hair sourced from across the country.

Sarah McClintock, Upbeat, 16 May 2016

 

Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Naked – In Every Sense of The Word

Jack Tame talks to restaurateur Seb Lyall about what’s behind his new clothing optional restaurant in London. The restaurant has a waiting list of 28,000 patrons.

 

Newstalk ZB, 1 May 2016

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

SunnyNapier

Hawke’s Bay on Film 1913 – 1985

- By Jane Paul (Community Programme Coordinator, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision and Historic Places Hawke’s Bay showed a compilation of films focused on Hawke’s Bay history in MTG’s beautiful theatre in Napier.

MTG Theatre.
MTG Theatre.

People started arriving an hour early, and soon the foyer was crammed with people ranging in age from 2 months to 95 years!

Fifteen-year-old Bonnie Allen – who provided musical accompaniment for the silent films – set herself up at the grand piano, and people streamed into the cinema.

audience.
Audience members gathered for “Hawke’s Bay on Film.”

The programme began with a look at the fishing industry in 1913 –  a fascinating glimpse of life on the trawlers and the use of carrier pigeons to convey information about the catch back to the mainland. Sunny Napier – The Brighton of New Zealand (1929) kept the audience enthralled with scenes of old, pre-earthquake Napier.

Interestingly, Alec Douglas Lambourne’s film of the great earthquake in Hastings drew the most applause. Continue reading

Auckland_F81839

Audio Curios: “The Beauty of Difference”

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

9 July 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the passing of the Homosexual Law Reform Bill. The occasion offers an opportunity to dip into Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s radio collection and explore how the taonga can highlight changing societal attitudes –  in this case focusing on some of the perspectives of our Members of Parliament.

 

"Eyewitness News," 24 May 1985, TVNZ
“Eyewitness News,” 24 May 1985, TVNZ

 

One of the more striking changes in attitude has been from former MP John Banks. In the mid-1980s he was vehemently opposed to homosexual law reform. Here he is speaking in Parliament in 1986 about this “evil” Bill.

 

Committee of the Whole House, Parliament, 25 March 1986. Appears in the Radio New Zealand documentary 20 Years Out!,  original audio sourced from LAGANZ (ref: 0234-B)

 

However, 27 years later, in April 2013, John Banks backed same-sex marriage. Here he is speaking during the third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill. The Bill passed its third and final reading 77 / 44.

 

Third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill, Parliament, 17 April 2013

  Continue reading

WTRM

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori

Māori Language Week began officially in 1975 and radio was involved right from the start in promoting the week and the use of te reo Māori. In the radio collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision we have programmes broadcast during those first years, in both English and te reo. They feature interviews with many of the promoters of the week, such as the members of the Te Reo Māori Society – who were instrumental in getting the language officially recognised and were behind the drive to get more Māori heard on our airwaves and TV screens.

Here you can listen to interviews in te reo from 1975, with Rawiri Rangitauira (Ngāti Whakaue) and Hakopa Te Whata (Ngāpuhi) or listen to interviews from 1976, with  Whaimutu Dewes (Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Rangitihi ) and Tamati Kruger (Ngāi Tūhoe).

In 1975,  there were no kura kaupapa Māori and the ground-breaking kōhanga reo movement had not yet started. So Windy Ridge Primary School on Auckland’s North shore was unusual in that it was teaching students te reo, which had been introduced to the curriculum in 1974. RNZ’s Māori programmes producer Haare Williams went to the school and recorded programmes for that first Māori Language Week in 1975:

“Māori Programmes” / “Te Puna Wai Kōrero,” September 1975 

You can listen to the full programmes online, in English here, or listen to them in te reo Māori here.

By 1978 there was growing concern that there were not enough teachers being trained to teach te reo and meet the demand from schools. Here you can listen to a radio programme in English featuring an interview with John Rangihau (Ngāi Tūhoe), about the training of Māori language teachers and the place of te reo in New Zealand society.

Listening to archived radio news coverage,  we can see that progress promoting use of te reo met with some resistance in Pākehā New Zealand through the 1980s.  Here is coverage from “Morning Report” in 1984, about the official outcry when a Post Office Tolls operator Naida Povey of Ngāti Whātua (now Naida Glavish, President of the Māori Party) started greeting callers with “Kia ora”:

“Morning Report,” 23 May 1984

Today, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision archives a multitude of programmes in te reo Māori every day, broadcast by  iwi radio stations around the country, as well as television productions from Māori Television. From our historic radio collection this item from 1964 still remains a perennial favourite with both Māori and Pākehā.  It is a radio advertisement from 1964 for the soap powder “Rinso.”  It was produced for an episode of the radio quiz show “It’s in the Bag” hosted by Selwyn Toogood. This episode was broadcast from Northland, where there would still have been a large te reo Māori-speaking population in 1964:

Radio commercial for Rinso performed in Māori, 1964

Rinso
Reckitt and Colman New Zealand : [Rinso packet. 1950s?]. Ref: Eph-F-PACKAGING-1950s-01. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23206427
 

Feature image:

March on Parliament in support of the Maori Language. Further negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1980/2470/20A-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22342091

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Treasured Pacific Languages Flourish

Kia orana, Fakaalofa lahi atu, Malo e lelei, Talofa lava, Fakatalofa atu, Kam na mauri, Ni sa bula vinaka, Halo oloketa and Malo ni!

In May this year Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision started a pilot project to welcome in more Pasifika radio programming for the national radio collection. In collaboration with Pacific Media Network, we have started collecting the community language shows that broadcast on Radio 531pi.

Based in Auckland, the Pacific Media Network is partly funded via NZ On-Air and is accessible to an estimated 92 percent of the country’s Pacific population. The network targets both first-generation Pacific migrants and New Zealand-born people with Pacific heritage. In this recording from the Solomon Islands Community Programme, the presenters wish everyone a happy Mother’s Day.

 

 Radio 531pi, May 2016

 

In all, nine Pacific languages are represented with the:

  • Cook Islands Community Programme – Mondays from 6pm-6am
  • Niuean Community Programme – Tuesdays from 6pm-6am
  • Tongan Community Programme – Wednesdays from 6pm-6am
  • Samoan Community Programme – Thursdays from 6pm-6am
  • Tuvaluan Community Programme – Fridays from 6pm-10pm
  • Kiribati Community Programme – Fridays  from 10pm-12am
  • Fijian Community Programme – Saturdays from 7pm-11pm
  • Solomon Islands Community Programme – Sundays from 2-4pm
  • Tokelauan Community Programme – Sundays from 4pm – 8pm (and then the Samoan Community Programme)

 

- By Gareth Watkins

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.