Tag Archives: 2000s

Happy 70th NZSO

The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra turns 70 this week, marking the anniversary of its first public performance in the Wellington Town Hall, on 6 March 1947. Extensive recordings from the orchestra’s early years are held in Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s sound collection, and RNZ Concert have drawn upon this archival audio to produce a series of programmes marking the event.

You can listen to them at the links below:

National Orchestra of the New Zealand Broadcasting Service: First season ... 1947. Wellington inaugural concert, Town Hall. Thursday March 6th. Souvenir programme. Ref: Eph-B-MUSIC-NO-1947-01-title. Alexander Turnbull Library http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23040179
National Orchestra of the New Zealand Broadcasting Service: First season … 1947. Wellington inaugural concert, Town Hall. Thursday March 6th. Souvenir programme. Ref: Eph-B-MUSIC-NO-1947-01-title. Alexander Turnbull Library http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23040179
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Michael Nicholson

- By Jane Paul (Community Programme Manager, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

At the age of 100, video artist, painter and sculptor Michael Nicholson has written a book! Due to be published by Steele Roberts Aotearoa in November, Visual Language Games documents his life’s work.

Download this flyer from Steel Roberts Aotearoa to learn more about the book.

In 2008, the Film Archive (as Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision was then known) exhibited Michael’s Visual Music Project, stages 1, 2 and 3 (pictured above). This production used the raw material from his 1977 work, using a Scanimate video synthesiser which – interfaced with a computer – added colour and movement to scanned-in artworks. Read the Visual Music Project exhibition essays here.

The first stage of this project was developed while he was an artist-in-residence at an Australian College for Advanced Education. Thirty years after its inception, Michael, with assistance from archive employee Diane McAllen, edited the footage to create Visual Music Project, stages 1, 2 and 3. This work takes colour and shape to generate a symphony of colour equivalent to that of music.  Continue reading

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Audio Curios: Children Will Listen

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has recently acquired a set of Insight documentaries, spanning 1997-2000, deposited  by Adriann Smith, a former Radio New Zealand producer. Insight is now the longest-running documentary programme on RNZ, having started back in the late 1960s. Gavin McGinley, RNZ National scheduler, recalls:

“As I remember, the National programme used to have a documentary on Sunday mornings in the 1960s. Most of the time they were BBC programmes with the occasional one from the ABC, CBC or SABC. Then I think they began to alternate – one homegrown documentary, one overseas. The first time I remember Insight being used as a series title was about the time I moved to 2ZD Masterton in 1969. And for the next few years the programme was known as Insight ‘69, Insight ‘70, Insight ‘71, etc.”

Adriann’s documentaries from the late 1990s cover a diverse range of subject matter – from revamping the public service to body image.

One that caught my eye from 1997 was “Culture and Cool” – young people speak about cultural change and the influence of mass media on cultural ideas. In this edited excerpt, students from Rongotai College in Wellington talk about how music influences fashion and how media influences language.

 

Insight ’97, “Culture and Cool” (Radio New Zealand) Continue reading

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Audio Curios: “The Beauty of Difference”

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

9 July 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the passing of the Homosexual Law Reform Bill. The occasion offers an opportunity to dip into Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s radio collection and explore how the taonga can highlight changing societal attitudes –  in this case focusing on some of the perspectives of our Members of Parliament.

 

"Eyewitness News," 24 May 1985, TVNZ
“Eyewitness News,” 24 May 1985, TVNZ

 

One of the more striking changes in attitude has been from former MP John Banks. In the mid-1980s he was vehemently opposed to homosexual law reform. Here he is speaking in Parliament in 1986 about this “evil” Bill.

 

Committee of the Whole House, Parliament, 25 March 1986. Appears in the Radio New Zealand documentary 20 Years Out!,  original audio sourced from LAGANZ (ref: 0234-B)

 

However, 27 years later, in April 2013, John Banks backed same-sex marriage. Here he is speaking during the third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill. The Bill passed its third and final reading 77 / 44.

 

Third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill, Parliament, 17 April 2013

  Continue reading

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Celebrating Dance in New Zealand

By Diane McAllen (Digital Programme Developer – Medianet, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

New Zealanders have always been dancing! From learning folk dances in stuffy school halls, to taking to the stage for awesome choreographed kapa haka or ballet, to just letting our hair down, trying a breakdance move or boogying with some mates, we have all taken part in some form of dance and no doubt enjoyed it.

This week (23-30 April) is New Zealand Dance Week, a national event that aims to celebrate and elevate the awareness of all forms of dance. Check out the DANZ website for dance events in your area. As part of Dance Week, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision are holding special film screenings in Wellington.

Within Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s collections, there are numerous films of New Zealanders tripping the light fantastic. Included are performances at community events such as fairs, galas, parades, and anniversaries, where children dance in formation, highland swing to bagpipes, dress in fairy costumes and twirl in rings. There are also a wealth of stage presentations, including by the Royal New Zealand Ballet, Limbs Dance Company, and Black Grace. Alongside these are television interviews with some of our most influential choreographers, such as Douglas Wright and Mary Jane O’Reilly. There are also short films were dance is a central artistic component – for example Len Lye’s Rainbow Dance (1936), and Phil Dadson’s Footstep Hocket(1990).

You can view these films and more at our Wellington or Auckland medialibraries or at our medianet sites around the country.

 

Here’s a fun selection of films to help you get into the swing of it.

Serpentine Dance (1895)
A “Skirt Dance,” a popular vaudeville attraction, performed by Annabelle Moore. This film was shown at Wellington’s first public screening of motion pictures, held at the Exchange Hall, 28 October 1896.

Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Sailing Away

Talkback callers respond to Willie and JT on the day Team New Zealand lose the America’s Cup in San Francisco (Radio Live, 26 Sep 2013).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Captain Cornflake

The show must go on…

Captain Cornflake valiantly soldiers on with a cold during the live children’s show “Space Station Kiwi” (2014, Otago Access Radio).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

The Day the Earth Moved Under Our Feet

- By Marie O’Connell (Audio Conservator, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

This piece was originally published in IASA journal issue 44, January 2015.

 

This article presents a personal account of a series of natural disasters — namely earthquakes — that my colleagues and I lived and worked through, and how those events affected our archive — Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision (then Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero). In particular, I intend to describe the recovery and relocation process, and our experience of restoring order to the physical archive.

The Sequence of Events

I began working at Sound Archives Ngā  Taonga Kōrero — an archive predominantly focused on collecting and preserving New Zealand’s recorded radio heritage — in 1994. In 2002, I moved to the United States where I would spend five years preserving Civil Rights Era oral histories in Mississippi. When Hurricane Katrina struck the southern United States in August, 2005, I experienced my first encounter with a major disaster.

Clock stopped at the time of the September earthquake, after falling off the wall.
Clock stopped at the time of the September earthquake, after falling off the wall.

Hurricanes are destructive and traumatic, but they do not usually arrive unannounced; earthquakes come without a warning. There is no opportunity to prepare, nor can their magnitude or duration be predicated — this fact was made evident to me three years after I had returned to Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero, when a 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch on September 4th, 2010, at 4.35am.

Like most people, I was woken when I was thrown out of my bed onto the floor, and — over the top of the earthquake’s rumble — I could hear the sound of things smashing in my house. Owing to the depth and distance of the earthquake’s epicentre, there were no fatalities, and our archive was more disheveled than damaged. When we returned to work after the events of that weekend, we discovered that many of our collections — consisting of open reel tapes, DATs, CD-Rs, cassettes, nitrocellulose discs, and documentation — had been ejected from their shelving. Our disaster plan did not prescribe a particular course of action, but common sense suggested that we should return our collections to their shelves and do what we could to secure them from ongoing aftershocks. On a very limited budget, John Kelcher — a fellow conservator — and I purchased cord and packing tape, which we secured over the front of each shelf as a temporary measure until proper earthquake bracing could be installed. Amazingly, this stopgap solution protected some items throughout the sizeable aftershocks that would continue to rock us over the next four months. On February 22, at 12.51pm, however, a magnitude 6.3 earthquake hit Christchurch. It was shallow, relatively close to the centre of the city, and profoundly destructive. Due to building collapse and falling masonry, 185 people would lose their lives.

Graph of the 22 February 2011 earthquake.
Graph of the 22 February 2011 earthquake.

I was just leaving the restroom when the earthquake hit. The force knocked me to the floor, and I could only watch as a solid wall cracked open in front of my eyes. The multi-story building that housed the archive was compromised, but still standing; however, the Methodist Church opposite our building collapsed immediately. The city centre was evacuated, and our building was immediately cordoned within a perimeter known as the ‘Red Zone’ — an area in which civilian access was forbidden. Uniformed army personnel secured every point of thoroughfare through this zone. Continue reading

“Thirty” Opens in Auckland

 - By Paula Booker (Programme Developer, Auckland)

This Monday night saw a well attended launch for our new Auckland exhibition, Thirty, based on the exhibition curated by Gareth Watkins for Wellington. Our small Auckland team was happily joined by a great turn out from organisations with an interest in raising awareness of HIV AIDS, a number of HIV positive individuals, plus educators and advocates, friends, and many who shared sad personal stories of love and loss through HIV AIDS were in attendance.

Paula introduces the Thirty exhibition.
Introducing the Thirty exhibition.

The Auckland manifestation of Thirty includes an expanded segment on women and HIV, which complements and contrasts with the original exhibition materials. Over recent months I have been working with organisations that have produced material directly addressing women’s experiences of HIV AIDS to acquisition this content into the collection, where I am glad it will be preserved for future researchers. This interesting experience of working with content producers and advocates highlighted to me that many producers of moving images are still unaware of the archive’s role in preserving their work for future research and viewing opportunities!

Paula thanks Michael Bancroft, New Zealand AIDS Quilt kaitiaki, for the loan of the quilts.
In this image I am thanking Michael Bancroft, New Zealand AIDS Memorial Quilt kaitiaki, for the loan of the quilts.

Continue reading