Tag Archives: Children

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Audio Curios: Children Will Listen

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has recently acquired a set of Insight documentaries, spanning 1997-2000, deposited  by Adriann Smith, a former Radio New Zealand producer. Insight is now the longest-running documentary programme on RNZ, having started back in the late 1960s. Gavin McGinley, RNZ National scheduler, recalls:

“As I remember, the National programme used to have a documentary on Sunday mornings in the 1960s. Most of the time they were BBC programmes with the occasional one from the ABC, CBC or SABC. Then I think they began to alternate – one homegrown documentary, one overseas. The first time I remember Insight being used as a series title was about the time I moved to 2ZD Masterton in 1969. And for the next few years the programme was known as Insight ‘69, Insight ‘70, Insight ‘71, etc.”

Adriann’s documentaries from the late 1990s cover a diverse range of subject matter – from revamping the public service to body image.

One that caught my eye from 1997 was “Culture and Cool” – young people speak about cultural change and the influence of mass media on cultural ideas. In this edited excerpt, students from Rongotai College in Wellington talk about how music influences fashion and how media influences language.

 

Insight ’97, “Culture and Cool” (Radio New Zealand) Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: “Dr Max”

Students from St Patrick’s School, Masterton interview “Dr Max” about the importance of sleep. The interview is part of Live Wires, a regular programme broadcast on Arrow FM (Wairarapa) featuring students from around the region.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

Listen to other episodes here

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Children Apples

An Apple a Day….

By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)
Image: New Zealand apples; Kidds O. Red 16. Good [Apple case label. 1940-60s]. Ref: Eph-B-FRUIT-1940/60-08. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23016982
Image: New Zealand apples; Kidds O. Red 16. Good [Apple case label. 1940-60s]. Ref: Eph-B-FRUIT-1940/60-08. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23016982

The early months of the year are harvest time in the Hawke’s Bay, Nelson, and other apple-growing regions of New Zealand – and there are several recordings in the Radio Collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision that tell the story of our favourite fruit and the huge export industry that has grown up around it. You can hear me talking to RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan about the recordings or you can listen to the full recordings below.

In 1940, during World War II, the New Zealand apple harvest was unable to be exported in such quantities as usual, because of the war affecting international shipping.  So there were something close to a million extra cases of apples that needed to be consumed domestically! To get Kiwis eating more apples, radio promotions such as a national apple-pie recipe competition were held and school children were encouraged to take at least one apple with them to school every day. Another competition was held to find a song to promote apples, and it was won by Ivan Perrin, who came came up with new lyrics to an old tune [1].  Here is one version of his winning “New Zealand Apple Song,” performed by Theo Walters’ Personality Band. The female vocalist is not identified on the disc, but may be Jean McPherson, New Zealand’s “Sweetheart of the Forces.” 

The New Zealand Apple Song, Theo Walters’ Personality Band, 1940

A rendition of Perrin’s “Apple Song” was also recorded by the children of Wellington’s Lyall Bay School and became hugely popular. An article in The Listener in March 1940 printed the lyrics “in response to many requests” and noted the daily playing of the song at 8.15am on commercial ZB radio stations, along with the ringing of a school bell, had become “a Dominion-wide signal for school kiddies to be on their way” [2]. Sadly, the original Lyall Bay School recording no longer exists, although a performance was re-recorded for a school reunion in 2002. Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Let’s Get Positive about Christmas

Tiff and Katie have some tips for having a stress-free Christmas with children under five (“Cold Tea & Laundry Piles,” Arrow FM, 20 December 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

You can hear the full episode here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

microphones

Merry Christmas

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

’tis the season, we’re getting into the Christmas spirit with some audio excerpts from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Sound Collection.

 

Clip 1: White boots, a red coat with an ermine trim and a hat with a bell… one of Wellington’s early Father Christmases,  85 year old Mr Parks, talks about becoming a  department store Santa in 1905, when he was hired by the D.I.C. department store on Lambton Quay. (Ref. 148010)

 Clip 2: The sounds and smells of a South Island beech forest are beautifully evoked by novelist Dame Ngaio Marsh in this wonderful description of Christmas camping in the bush,  just before World War I. (Ref. 1474)

Glentui, Canterbury, looking down creek with trees on either side. The Press (Newspaper) :Negatives. Ref: 1/1-009860-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/29942387
The forest where Dame Ngaio Marsh camped. Glentui, Canterbury, looking down creek with trees on either side. The Press (Newspaper): Negatives. Ref: 1/1-009860-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/29942387

 

Clip 3. The Christmas carol “Tūpono Mai  - While Shepherds Watched,” sung in Māori and English by the children of Hiruhārama School, just outside Ruatōrea in 1939. Their school choir became quite famous from the 1930s onwards for the quality of their singing.  Prime Minister Peter Fraser visited the school when he was Minister of Education, and was so impressed he arranged for the children to go to Wellington to make some recordings and radio broadcasts, which he thought would be useful for other schools to hear.  (Ref. 30000)

Audio excerpts from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: 11 Years of Bullying

Jesse Greenslade, author of the anti-bullying children’s book First Week Blues, talks to Wallace Chapman about being continually bullied at school and the subsequent apologies he received years later from his tormentors (“Sunday Morning with Wallace Chapman,” Radio New Zealand National, 1 February 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

You can hear the full interview here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Carterton School Radio Show

Michael and Paige introduce the show from a secret location at Carterton School, and talk about games at lunchtime (including Duck Duck Goose), organising a mufti-day for Nepal, and scooter safety at school (Carterton School Radio Show, 7/6/15, Arrow FM). The show broadcasts monthly Wairarapa’s community/access radio station Arrow FM.

Listen here:

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Captain Cornflake

The show must go on…

Captain Cornflake valiantly soldiers on with a cold during the live children’s show “Space Station Kiwi” (2014, Otago Access Radio).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

“Hello Children” – Broadcasts to the British Child Evacuees of World War II

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Co-ordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Evacuees to New Zealand, 1940. (The National Archives UK DO 131/15
)
Evacuees to New Zealand, 1940.
(The National Archives UK DO 131/15
)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Radio Collection contains hundreds of recordings made during World War II. The best known are the many discs recorded by the staff of the National Broadcasting Service Mobile Unit, who travelled with New Zealand forces. From North Africa, Italy and through the Pacific… the mobile unit was there, recording interviews, messages home and special programmes, such as the much-loved concerts by members of the Māori Battalion.

Back home in New Zealand, the National Broadcasting Service was monitoring the shortwave radio broadcasts from overseas. A 24-hour “listening watch” was maintained in the control room of station 2YA in Wellington, staffed by a broadcasting technician and equipped with disc recorders (tape recording technology would only arrive in the 1950s.)

Basil Clarke on listening watch at 2YA during World War II, recording an in-coming broadcast.    (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection)
Basil Clarke records an incoming broadcast while on listening watch.
(Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection)

Anything of interest could be immediately recorded on disc for local re-broadcast. Many of these recordings survive in our collection. Often they are news bulletins, telling the world of historic events such as the fall of Singapore or the Battle of Arnhem. But these recordings also captured poignant personal communications and stories of the war-time experience, such as these two excerpts of a bittersweet little programme called “Hello Children”:

[Archival audio from the Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection. Any re-use of this audio is a breach of Copyright. To request a copy of the recording, contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz]

 

“Hello Children” was aimed at the 3,000-odd British children who had been evacuated overseas at the start of the war. The two episodes we’ve shared above were transmitted in the BBC’s Pacific Service to New Zealand on the 22nd of February and 6th of May 1942.

When France fell to the Nazis in May 1940 and the Allies were evacuated from Dunkirk, fears of a German invasion became very real to Britons. Wealthier families were able to pay to send their children to live with overseas friends and family members. American companies such as Kodak and Ford set up schemes to evacuate the children of their British employees to the United States. The public soon demanded that overseas evacuation to be made available to families from all walks of life. In response, the Children’s Overseas Reception Board (CORB) scheme was established by the British government in June 1940. Continue reading