Tag Archives: Dunedin

Commercial radio feature

Happy Birthday NZ Commercial Radio!

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

This Saturday is the 80th anniversary of national commercial radio in New Zealand, which started with station 1ZB Auckland on 29 October 1936.  Radio had been operating in New Zealand since the 1920s, but advertising was generally not allowed and stations were mostly financed via a licence fee paid by listeners, or via sponsorship from a related business, such as a music retailer. 1ZB had been broadcasting in Auckland for several years already as a private station, owned by Methodist minister Reverend Colin Scrimgeour. 

 

Aunt Daisy (Maud Ruby Basham), a darling of NZ commercial radio (image: Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Documentation Collection).
Aunt Daisy (Maud Ruby Basham), a darling of NZ commercial radio (image: Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Documentation Collection).

 

In 1936 the first Labour government under Prime Minister Michael Joseph Savage bought 1ZB and re-opened it as the first station of the government-owned National Commercial Broadcasting Service. 2ZB, 3ZB and 4ZB followed in quick succession, bringing commercial broadcasting to Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. Former 1ZB owner, Rev. Scrimgeour – or “Uncle Scrim” – was appointed as head of the new service.

Announcers such as Maud Basham, the legendary “Aunt Daisy,” became firm listener favourites on the commercial network, with her chatty programme of infomercials, recipes and household hints, along with new features such as sponsored radio serials, quiz shows, hit parades, sports commentary and talent quests – all paid for by advertising. The commercial network also hired Māori broadcasters in each centre: Uramo Paora “Lou Paul” in Auckland, Kingi Tahiwi in Wellington, Te Ari Pitama and Airini Grenell in Christchurch and Dunedin.

The government soon discovered commercial radio was a great income earner. In the first year of operation, the four commercial stations made a profit of 10,000 pounds.  After World War II, income from the commercial network was used to establish the National Orchestra – later the NZSO.

The commercial network grew to include regional and provincial stations and ran side by side with the non-commercial network as part of the New Zealand Broadcasting Service (and various later incarnations such as the N.Z.B.C. and Radio New Zealand), until it was sold off by the government in 1996. The ZB stations became part of The Radio Network – and are better known today as NewstalkZB.

You can hear what 1930s commercial radio sounded like in this 1961 documentary.

Robin Hyde feature

National Poetry Day

To mark National Poetry Day today,  here is a historic radio broadcast from 1939 by politician and novelist John A. Lee – paying tribute to the New Zealand poet Iris Wilkinson, better known as Robin Hyde.

John Alfred Alexander Lee, Labour Under-Secretary, giving a speech [Orakei, Auckland?]. Whites Aviation Ltd : Photographs. Ref: WA-67319-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22857067
John Alfred Alexander Lee, Labour Under-Secretary, giving a speech [Orakei, Auckland?]. Whites Aviation Ltd : Photographs. Ref: WA-67319-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22857067

Today we might call John A. Lee a social justice activist. He grew up in poverty in Dunedin at the end of the 19th century, was a vagrant and then imprisoned as a young man for petty crime – where he discovered socialism. He fought in WWI, where he was decorated for bravery and lost an arm. Eventually, on his return to New Zealand during the Depression of the 1930s, he got into politics and wrote his first novel, Children of the Poor.

Robin Hyde. S P Andrew Ltd : Portrait negatives. Ref: 1/2-043599-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22770176
Robin Hyde. S P Andrew Ltd : Portrait negatives. Ref: 1/2-043599-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22770176

While in Parliament he met young Iris Wilkinson, who was working in the Press Gallery at the age of just 17. She is best known today as a novelist, for her World War I novel Passport to Hell and the autobiographical The Godwits Fly, but in the 1920s and early 1930s she was best known as a poet. She was plagued by ill health, mental illness and drug addiction and after a very adventurous but tragically short life, she committed suicide in 1939 in London. John A. Lee had maintained a long correspondence with her throughout her life, and in he took to the airwaves to give this moving tribute:

 

Tribute to Robin Hyde by John A. Lee (1939). Full information about this recording is available here.

 

Audio  from the Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

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Audio Curios: The Horses Stayed Behind

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has started acquiring the arts programme Upbeat, which broadcasts every weekday on RNZ Concert. Upbeat covers a wide range of art topics, and – to my knowledge – is the only national daily radio arts programme in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

"The Horses Stayed Behind," courtesy of Cat Auburn, http://www.catauburn.com
“The Horses Stayed Behind,” courtesy of Cat Auburn

 

A recent interview saw host Eva Radich interview Sarah McClintock from the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui about the art work The Horses Stayed Behind. The work by artist Cat Auburn is a memorial to the thousands of horses that were transported from Aotearoa and died in Word War I. The artwork is made up of hundreds of rosettes created using horse hair sourced from across the country.

Sarah McClintock, Upbeat, 16 May 2016

 

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8

Otago Museum’s “Hākui: Women of Kāi Tahu” Exhibition

By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

The lives of fifty Māori women of Te Waipounamu (the South Island) are the focus of a new exhibition at the Otago Museum, which is enriched by sound recordings from the radio collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

Hakui7

Hākui: Women of Kāi Tahu was developed over two years by the museum in close partnership with whānau and papatipu rūnaka around the South Island. 

The exhibition opened on November 20 to coincide with the biennial Hui-ā-Iwi gathering that saw over 2,000 iwi members arrive in Dunedin for the weekend celebration of Kāi Tahutanga.

The term hākui is an acknowledgement of respect and a form of address to a female elder, and this exhibition celebrates mothers, aunties, grandmothers, taua, great aunts, great grandmothers, and tūpuna wāhine.

Fifty women are profiled in the exhibition, and their accomplishments shared through taoka*, photographs, memories and sound recordings. Interactive elements also feature, inviting visitors to step inside Aunty’s kitchen, hear the pronunciation of Māori words and placenames, and plenty more.

Curator
Migoto Eria (Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Kahungunu), Curator, Māori at the Otago Museum, listening to one of the archival sound recordings from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

Migoto Eria (Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Kahungunu), Curator, Māori at the Otago Museum, says the process of deciding which of the women to focus on was led by the iwi, with a steering committee representing local rūnaka set up in 2013.:

“The hākui featured in this exhibition have facilitated the growth and nourishment of their mokopuna; they have protected and shared their knowledge; and they have provided vital guidance and support to their iwi,” she says. “So it has been an honour to work closely with whānau and rūnaka on this important kaupapa.”

Last year Migoto contacted us at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s radio collection in Christchurch, to see what sound recordings we might hold relating to these wāhine. Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Daytrippin’ with Nina

Nina introduces her Radio One show “Daytrippin’” on the day that there was anonymous shooting threat on the University of Otago campus (Radio One 91FM, 7 October 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Audio Curios: Trying and Finding New Things

Hana and Sophie talk about trying new activities and how they find out about things in today’s world (Otago Access Radio, 13 July 2015).

This programme is part of a 21-part series called “Young leaders in a changing world,” which broadcast on Otago Access Radio earlier this year.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: 57 Years On the Wireless

Broadcaster Neil Collins recently retired from Radio Dunedin after 57 years in the industry.

In this excerpted interview with Jim Sullivan he recounts starting up a Hit Parade, and the “light and shade” of radio announcing.

This interview featured in Jim Sullivan’s Sounds Historical (4 October 2015), which is collected as part of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s 24/7 capture of Radio New Zealand National.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

Jim’s full programme can be heard here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: A Valuable Lesson

Cameron Toogood recalls a valuable lesson he learnt in school (“Young Leaders in a Changing World,” Otago Access Radio, 16 March 2015). Cameron’s interview is part of a 21-part series called “Young Leaders in a Changing World,” which profiled young people leading change in Otago. The series was produced by Otago Access Radio.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

The full series can be heard online here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Visiting Royals

Bernard Kearns commentates on the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh arriving at their hotel in Christchurch and Don Donaldson interviews Mrs Derbyshire in the Square, who has been waiting for hours (1954, NZ Broadcasting Service), and the team from Global Kids discuss how they are going to greet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge when they visit Dunedin (2014, Otago Access Radio).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

Scenes and Views Around New Zealand c. 1913

By James Taylor, NZFA Cataloguer / Researcher

The 100th anniversary of the 1913 Great Strike, “one of New Zealand’s most violent and disruptive industrial confrontations” (nzhistory.net.nz), is being marked in October and November this year. While there is no extant footage from the strike itself, there is plenty of material in the Film Archive’s vault from around that period and we have put a collection of clips together to give visitors to the Archive’s TV Lounge a sense of the places, people and events that were captured on film in New Zealand around 1913.

F7107 [FUNDRAISING JERVOIS QUAY WELLINGTON 1918]
F7107 [FUNDRAISING JERVOIS QUAY WELLINGTON 1918]
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